The Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI), says the adverse operating environment of the nation’s ports will continue to hinder Federal Government’s effort, to reduce its dependence on oil revenues for economic development.

The LCCI President, Babatunde Ruwase, made the statement during the LCCI Freight Forwarders Group Annual Seminar on Thursday in Lagos at the LCCI’s corporate office, Victoria Island.Tagged: “Trade Facilitation on Nigeria Integrated Customs Information System (NICIS II)-Advantages and Development“, Ruwase said that significant efforts were made in reforming the maritime sector through concessioning of the ports in the early 2000s, but results of the reforms were below expectations.

He said that the regulatory landscape was complex with numerous public agencies regulating private terminal operators and myriad of businesses in freight forwarding, logistics and trade.

“Consequently, operators and users of Nigerian ports are faced with bureaucratic red tape, constant delays, high cost and illegal charges,” he said.He said that, the Nigeria Customs Service (NCS) in its bid to surmount the problem, introduced the Nigerian Integrated Customs Information System (NICIS II) to facilitate ease of doing business.

“While we commend the efforts of the Customs Service in the introduction of NICIS II, we would like to underscore the need for Customs to do more in the area of trade facilitation.” The business community still encounters too many problems in cargo clearing process. This is not consistent with the ease of doing business agenda of the government,” he said.